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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
" proof of life. >> what the u.s. government is stage also the reaction from the overjoyed family. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> i'm mike marusarz sitting in for rob nelson. that agent was working in iran when he disappeared and now u.s. officials say though don't know why they're finally getting this evidence that he's still alive. >> and also ahead, more navy officers get called on the carpet and punished. that's after a navy commander filmed anti-gay videos on the ship. the angry words from the top brass. >>> coming up later, the uproar at northwestern university, it's outside chicago. the story involves a sex toy demonstration done in the classroom. >> yeah, wait until you hear about this. pretty -- pretty saucy stuff. i don't know how to describe it. >> you could go a lot of different ways there. we'll leave it there. >> very well. >>> first, nearly four years after vanishing in iran, there is proof of life. the u.s. government says this morning a missing retired fbi agent is alive. >> that's right. as
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
>>> good morning. making the case. president obama gets set to address the nation tonight, on the u.s. mission in libya, from short-term goals to a possible exit strategy. this as rebel forces gain ground, and allied air strikes continue to pound targets inside libya, including moammar gadhafi's hometown. >>> radiation scare. after a partial meltdown at japan's crippled nuclear plant, radiation levels are 100,000 times higher than normal. as the government warns that the contamination is creeping into sea water and the ground, now traces of radiation are being detected as far away as massachusetts. >>> and wedding worries. with just over one month to go until the royal wedding, a huge anti-government protest in london turned violent, putting a renewed spotlight on security for the big day. this as new details emerge on everything from the cake to the bachelor party "early" this monday morning, march 28th, bachelor party "early" this monday morning, march 28th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning from london. you are looking at a beautiful day here. we are live at buckingha
's response. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more 270 people, including 19 americans, died in the bombing of pan am flight 103, shocking accusation from defectors, that moammar gadhafi may have himself ordered the terror attack. sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made in the last days by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the lockerbie victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. stephanie's husband, michael, justice department lawyer, was on the flight. >> we had chosen to look the other way because of business
>>> good morning. moammar gadhafi troops launch a major counteroffensive. is it time for the u.s. to consider arming the opposition? >>> dangerous dyes -- does the coloring in foods we eat every day have a negative impact on a child's mood and behavior? this morning, the new search for a link and what some parents are already doing just in case. >>> and the polar prince on his trek through the arctic. prince harry opens up to us about his most important duty at the royal wedding. >> are you thinking about what you will say? think about what you'll say when i'm stuck in a tent. our conversation with prince harry today, wednesday 30th, 2011. . good morning, welcome to "today" on a wednesday, i'm matt laur. >> rebels were making a rapid advance toward tripoli. >> those rebels retreated some 100 miles we'll get the late echt in a live report from libya straight ahead. and we'll talk to republican congresswoman michelle bachmann, who has been critical of president obama's involvement of troops in libya. >> a bizarre case in florida, an honor student who has been offered scholarships t
moammar gadhafi's troops launch a counter offensive. is it time for the u.s. to consider arming the opposition? >>> dangerous dyes -- does the coloring in foods we eat every day have a negative impact on children's food and behavior? what some parents are already doing just in case. >>> and the polar prince on his trek to the arctic. he opened up to us about his most important duty at his brother's wedding. >> are you thinking about what you will say? >> writing a speech while i'm stuck in a tent at minus 40. >> our conversation with prince harry today, wednesday, march >> our conversation with prince harry today, wednesday, march 30, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. the rebels in libya, aided by coalition air strikes were making a rapid advance to tripoli but have taken a beating from forces loyal to moammar gadhafi today. >> the rebels have retreated some 100 miles. we'll have the late nest a live report from libya ahead. we'll also talk to michelle bachman w
. the u.s. government now says robert levinson is alive and being held somewhere in southeast asia. it's asking iran for help reuniting levinson with his family. but iran says they know nothing. >>> the nfl and the players union have gone into overtime. they put another 24 hours on the clock to settle their labor dispute. midnight tonight is the new deadline for both sides to agree on the $9 billion revenue sharing package, or face the first work stoppage since 1987. >>> and airfares are taking off again. the major airlines are charging up to $20 more for round-trip domestic flights. it's the sixth time this year they've raised fares, thanks to high oil prices. >>> there's a major, new survey out on sex this morning. it shows abstinence is in. 28% say they have never had sexual contact with another person. many say, they're just too busy with other activities. >> it was another -- they never had that kind of thing. okay. >> okay. >> it's friday. >>> let's go -- happy friday. you were thinking it. >> fine. now, i have to take it. fine. good morning, everybody. and happy friday. let's ge
intelligence-gatherering. this is the first step to where the u.s. could be doing covertly arming the rebels in their fight against gadhafi. now, u.s. officials caution that they have not done that yet. this is essentially laying the legal groundwork to do that. once you do, it comes under fairly strict congressional oversight, but done in a classified way, carl. >> chuck, what has the white house said about this? what are they legally able to say if they want to deny it? >> reporter: it's a covert operation and is legally deniable. that's number one. the white house is not confirming anything. obviously a few weeks ago when this crisis began they did announce that the full capabilities of the u.s. intelligence community would be used. now, at the time the implication was this was about the over the air surveillance, things like that in order to try to track gadhafi's movements. it was also at that time that the cia operatives were going into the country to begin gathering intelligence about the operation and gadhafi. one other thing, carl, the u.s. intelligence community is very optimistic
. >>> well, 40 minutes past the hour now on this "american morning." check this out, u.s. military creating hummingbird-shaped drones. could they actually change the way the u.s. fights wars? >> well, it say prototype, not ready to go just yet, but certainly, fascinating. chris lawrence is in l.a. with more. i just love that preview of seeing that hummingbird fly all around you. how are they makes this work? >> kiran, t.j., this thing is pretty amazing. it moves like an actual living thing and it weighs less, less than a aa battery. imagine this thing perched on a telephone wire, and you can really start to imagine how difficult it would be to even know it was watching you. imagine a drone as small as a hummingbird, same shape, same sound. wait -- don't imagine. it's here. in this california lab. >> it looks more or less like an indigenous small bird and can fly through small clearings and trees. >> reporter: he says this is how the bird sees us from above. right now, the hummingbird can only fly a little longer than ten minutes. but at that size, imagine what it could do in ten hours. the
request for the u.s. gs is one of those where i wish we could have someone from the white house come up and place a hand on the bible and raise his or her right hand and explain themselves because this is a budget that has four things by cutting $89 million and 230fde's from core science programs this budget runs counter to the president's commitment to restore science to its rightful place. second by proposing a washington monument-type cuts to programs like endocrine stream gauges, you see how i said that that the american people care about the budget shows that this administration is willing to play games with this congress by testing our resolve during these serious fiscal times third by inheriting the full funding responsibilities for lancet 9 and 10 from nasa without any of nasa's $19 billion budget and by offsetting the $48 million increase for lancet from other core science programs this budget is assigned of the untenable situation we're likely to be in two years from now when the administration sends up a budget request for lancet that is nearly 10 times the increased proposed
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
a closer look at some of the damage on the west coast of the u.s. >>> back here in maryland the rain has passed, but still there were big flooding concerns in parts of the state overnight. the dam on the susquehanna river rose above flood stage. 23 floodgates are still open and the dam is operating under spill conditions. but the water levels are expected to recede as the morning moves on. people in nearby areas were taking the uncertainty in stride. >> well, this has been here for about 300 years, this little town, and its still here. it's flooded a lot of years. so i don't think it's going anywhere any time soon. >> it was a similar scene elsewhere in the state yesterday. in frederick county, wide stretches of roads were under water. submerging some pastures and cropland. warnings went out early enough to avoid rescue and property damage. >>> the actress who starred at snoop on the hbo series the wire remains behind bars this morning. a judge denied felicia pierson bail on charges of conspiring to sell heroin. she and 63 others were arrested this week in a wide ranging drug sweep. the
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >> and you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >> absolutely. >> really is. >>> before that, the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to found rebel forces. >> hospitals in the rebel-controlled cities are trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns ras lanuf and bin jawad. abc news was able to make it as far as brega before being turned around
is trying to recruit in the u.s. in new york hundreds gathered to declare it a witch hunt. >>> japan suspended the use of vaccines after the deaths of four children last week. health officials say the children died within three days of being vaccinated for pneumonia and meningitis. both companies are cooperating with the investigation. carnival recall bragss a-- carn celebrations are under way. it's now time for another check of the weather with al roker outside. >> all righty. thanks, natalie. what's your name? >> cory. >> and you're leaving for iraq tomorrow? >> yes, sir. >> be safe. come back and see us when you come back. >> thank you. >> let'sback. >> thank you. >> let's see what's happening. burlington, vermont. wptz, heavy snow, 25 degrees out. as we look at the rest of the country, we can see that storm system moving out through new england, bringing the snow to places and looking at wet weather out west, and another big storm system getting itself together in the plains that will bring mountain snow and into tomorrow night and wednesday some severe weather down through the l
to scale back u.s. military involvement in libya. >>> and tiger woods tees off in the arnold palmer invitational this afternoon. it has been a year since woods won a pro golf tournament. >> you know he's saying, please, let me win something. >> hope his putter works. >> oh, boy. okay. >>> finally, as you know, we do love animal stories around here. so, we could not pass up the chance to tell you about a cat in england named smokey. smokey the cat. >> name smokey the cat. reminds me of the movie "friday." they say when a cat is happy he purrs. smokey must be the happiest cat in the world. nick watt has the story. >> reporter: smokey seems pretty normal. fury, friendly, but that's because the volume's down. crank it -- unreal. and almost constant. is smokey the loudest cat in the world? 92 decibels. most cats peak at 20. but what does 92 decibels mean? well, it's louder than a washing machine. that's 70. about the same of a truck engine idling across the street and just a fraction less than what you would hear from a jet engine as a plane comes in to land. who's a nois
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)